painting and photographic works

abstract painting

Mountains (a Series – Part 2)

In this part 2, I share more mountain paintings, a few more from the Banff region with a couple more based on reference photos from when I cycled the “Golden Triangle” in May of 2010.

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“Sun Play II”, oil on hardboard, 41 by 30 cm, 2009

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“Mountains Over Vermilion River”, oil on hardboard, 30 by 41 cm, 2010

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“Mountain’s Edge”, oil on hardboard, 51 by 61 cm, 2009

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“On the Ridge”, oil on canvas, 46 by 46 cm, 2010

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“Rocky Mountain Serene” oil on canvas, 23 x 30 cm, 2009

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untitled, oil on hardboard, 20 by 30 cm, 2009


Lines (an Abstract Painting Series)

This small series from the autumn of 2012 was an exploration of mark making into the wet surface of an oil-painted canvas:

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“Marks”, oil on hardboard, 30 by 30 cm, 2012

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“Fall”, Oil on canvas, 46 by 46 cm, 2012

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“Lines in a Field”, oil on hardboard, 30 by 30 cm, 2012

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“Spirals”, Oil on canvas, 46 by 46 cm, 2012

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“Maxwell”, Oil on hardboard, 61 by 61 cm, 2012


Night Train (a Series)

This painting series was a bit unique for me. It had a common theme in terms of the subject matter – all of the images were drawn from what I saw (and captured with photos) during the night while on a train between Edmonton and Vancouver in November of 2007. What was unique for me was the use of oil pastel on a number of the works, and oil paint on a couple of larger ones.

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“Rolling Through the Night”, oil on canvas, 41 by 51 cm, Nov 2008

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“November Rockies Dusk”, oil pastel on paper, 23 x 30 cm, 2009

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“Passing in the Night”, oil pastel on paper, 23 x 30 cm, 2008

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“Night Siding”, oil pastel on paper, 23 x 30 cm, 2009

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“Dawn Arrival”, oil pastel on paper, 23 x 30 cm, 2009

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“Supporting the Dawn”, oil pastel on paper, 30 x 23 cm, 2008

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“Morning Train into Vancouver “, oil on hardboard, 61 x 71 cm, 2008


Earth Light Tapestries Series (part 3)

This blog post shares the last eight works of my 24-piece Earth Light Tapestries series of paintings. The first 16 pieces were shared in Parts 1 and 2 of this blog post.

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“Earth Light Tapestry XVII”, acrylic on hardboard, 24 by 24 inches (61 x 61 cm)

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“Earth Light Tapestry XVIII”, acrylic on hardboard, 24 by 24 inches (61 x 61 cm)

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“Earth Light Tapestry XIX”, acrylic on hardboard, 24 by 24 inches (61 x 61 cm)

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“Earth Light Tapestry XX”, acrylic on hardboard, 24 by 24 inches (61 x 61 cm)

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“Earth Light Tapestry XXI”, acrylic on hardboard, 24 by 24 inches (61 x 61 cm)

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“Earth Light Tapestry XXII”, acrylic on hardboard, 24 by 24 inches (61 x 61 cm)

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“Earth Light Tapestry XXIII”, acrylic on hardboard, 24 by 24 inches (61 x 61 cm)

The 24th (final) piece in this series was completed in July 2007, about 8 months after the start. About half of the series formed a solo exhibition at the Gallery at Milner (Library in Edmonton) in November of 2009.

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“Earth Light Tapestry XXIV”, acrylic on hardboard, 24 by 24 inches (61 x 61 cm)


Earth Light Tapestries Series (part 2)

In this blog post, I present the middle third (pieces 9 – 16) of my 2006/7 Earth Light Tapestries series of abstract paintings. (The first 8 pieces are shown in Part 1 of this blog post)

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“Earth Light Tapestry IX”, acrylic on hardboard, 24 by 24 inches (61 x 61 cm)

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“Earth Light Tapestry X”, acrylic on hardboard, 24 by 24 inches (61 x 61 cm)

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“Earth Light Tapestry XI”, acrylic on hardboard, 24 by 24 inches (61 x 61 cm)

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“Earth Light Tapestry XII”, acrylic on hardboard, 24 by 24 inches (61 x 61 cm)

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“Earth Light Tapestry XIII”, acrylic on hardboard, 24 by 24 inches (61 x 61 cm)

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“Earth Light Tapestry XIV (The Sun King)”, acrylic on hardboard, 24 by 24 inches (61 x 61 cm)

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“Earth Light Tapestry XV”, acrylic on hardboard, 24 by 24 inches (61 x 61 cm)

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“Earth Light Tapestry XVI”, acrylic on hardboard, 24 by 24 inches (61 x 61 cm)

The final group of paintings from this series can be seen in part 3 of this blog post.


The Earth Light Tapestries Series (Part 1)

The non-representational (abstract) painting series which I called “Earth Light Tapestries was my largest and most deliberate series. I began the series in late 2006 and finished in early 2007. A dozen pieces from this series were exhibited in a solo show at the Milner Library in Edmonton in November of 2009.

From the start, I set out with the goal to paint 24 pieces, each which would be 24 by 24 inches (61 x 61 cm) in size. I used acrylic paints with the intent to be experimental with textures and additives. The “earth” in the series title refers to the “earth” pigments (ochres, umbers, sienna, etc.) that dominated the colors through this series.

The pieces were just given numerical titles (in roman numerals) corresponding to the order in which they were created.

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“Earth Light Tapestry I”, acrylic on hardboard, 24 by 24 inches (61 x 61 cm)

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“Earth Light Tapestry II”, acrylic on hardboard, 24 by 24 inches (61 x 61 cm)

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“Earth Light Tapestry III”, acrylic on hardboard, 24 by 24 inches (61 x 61 cm)

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“Earth Light Tapestry IV (Windy City Sand Storm)”, acrylic on hardboard, 24 by 24 inches (61 x 61 cm)

The “sand” reference in “IV” comes from the texture which was created by the mixing a fine sand into the paint and gel media.

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“Earth Light Tapestry V”, acrylic on hardboard, 24 by 24 inches (61 x 61 cm)

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“Earth Light Tapestry VI”, acrylic on hardboard, 24 by 24 inches (61 x 61 cm)

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“Earth Light Tapestry VII”, acrylic on hardboard, 24 by 24 inches (61 x 61 cm)

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“Earth Light Tapestry VIII”, acrylic on hardboard, 24 by 24 inches (61 x 61 cm)

The rest of the pieces in this painting series are presented in Parts 2 and 3 of this blog post series.


Whales Atrium (a Painting Series)

One of my weirdest (and by weird I mean quirky and fun) painting series was the abstract group of paintings that I did in 2010 and which I called “Whales Atrium”*. In this series I played around with various acrylic media and additive in a very exploratory and undirected way. Other than the lack of any direction other than to experiment, the common element to the 12 paintings in this series is the size – all works are on 30 by 30 cm (12 inch) hardboard panels.

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“Eggman”

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“English Garden”

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“Ga Joob”

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“I am He”

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“If the Sun Don’t Shine”

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“I’m Crying”

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“Penguin Singing”

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“See How They Fly”

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“See How They Run”

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“Sitting on a Cornflake”

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“Smile Like Pigs”

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“The Joker Laughs”

Don’t try to read too much into the titles of these works, they were largely an afterthought.

* I am still waiting for someone to “get” the significance of this series title. Let me know if you think you do.


Twitter Art Exhibit 2016

I am participating again in the Twitter Art Exhibit. I mailed my postcard-sized painting today. It should comfortably get to New York by the March 11 deadline.
Here’s an image of my piece, entitled “Restless”:

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This, the sixth, Twitter Art Exhibit runs March 31 to April 21 (2016) at the Trygve Lie Gallery in New York City.

Like all of the preceding Twitter art exhibitions, the works are donated by artists from around the world and sold, with proceeds going to charity. There is no theme for the exhibit (the only thread connecting the exhibit is that all of the artists are on Twitter), so the range of works is mind boggling. To get a feel for the diversity, look inside the book featuring the works from the 2014 Twitter Art Exhibit that was held in Orlando.

The first Twitter Art Exhibit was held in 2010 in Moss, Norway, the hometown of founder David Sandum (@DavidSandumArt), after he called upon his many international artist friends on Twitter. The rest as they say is history.

My Twitter handle is: @RandallTT


Photographic References for Abstract Painting?

It has become quite common (an pretty much acceptable) for artists to paint from photographic references rather than from a model in the studio or from a landscape “en plein air”. But do photographs have any value to an “abstract” painter? Well, for me they certainly do. One of my favorite forms of photography is abstractions, especially¬† those that push to the edge of non-representational-ism. Through the use of camera-motion and long exposures, with a bit of post-processing to enhance colors and contrast (and some cropping), I regularly come of with images that I will use to inspire my paintings. Here are some recent examples (all are photographs) that I can’t help thinking would make dramatic largish paintings on canvases/boards/paper in acrylic, oil or pastel.

Spot Lit

Surreal Manuscript

Light on Blue

Light on Blue

Cubist Portrait

Cubist Portrait

Base

Base

Sweep

Sweep

My painting are yet to come out of any of these images and I’m not sure how related the final work might appear in comparison to these references but some day I shall tackle them.


Jock Macdonald at the Vancouver Art Gallery

While recently in Vancouver I did what I try to do every time that I make it to that city – visit the Vancouver Art Gallery and very specifically to visit their collection of Emily Carr paintings. The Vancouver Art Gallery occupies a wonderful old building in downtown Vancouver with the top floor gallery devoted to Emily Carr. There are however 3 other floors, exhibiting other shows and what ever I can see there is just a bonus for me. See my previous post about what I saw on the Emily Carr floor on this visit.

Perhaps the highlight for me on this visit was the exhibition “Jock Macdonald: Evolving Forms“.20141116_110656_1 I must admit that before I got there, I’d heard there was an exhibit of work by the Canadian painter J. MacDonald and I just assumed it was J.E.H MacDonald, one of my favorite painters from the Group of Seven.

But wrong I was. It was a different Macdonald and while I guess I’d heard the of Jock Macdonald but never really seen his work – I got a good education!

Jock (more formally James William Galloway) Macdonald was a leading Canadian modernist painter of the 20th Century. He was born (1897) and raised in Scotland before coming to Canada in the 1920’s. He first settled in Vancouver but would live in a number of places in Canada before passing away in 1960 in Toronto after over a decade there.

His early training was as a designer and some of his early work bears the influence of commercial design. In Canada he worked with Fred Varley of the Group of Seven  and produced some fine landscape canvases that fit right in with the work of the Group.

But most significantly (and enlightening for me) was his development as a leading modernist abstract painter. In fact he was an important member of the Canadian Painters Eleven group.

20141106_162403_2Accompanying the exhibit is a fine catalog (printed by black dog publishing), that I just had to bring home with me as a reminder and reference, after seeing the exhibition.

Jock Macdonald: Evolving Forms runs at the Vancouver Art Gallery until 2015 January 4th.

[link to Jock Macdonald at the National Gallery of Canada website]