painting and photographic works

Posts tagged “Emily Carr

West Coast (a Painting Series)

In around 1992 after visits to Canada’s west coast (particularly the Gulf Islands), I produced, perhaps my favorite series of paintings. This collection featured trees(and/or driftwood), shorelines and often active skies. My works at this time may show signs of influence from the paintings of Emily Carr.

bending-to-the-sky-1992-aonm-24x24-web

“Bending to the Sky”, acrylic on hardboard, 61 by 61 cm, 1992

windswept-1992-aonm-20x24-web

“Windswept”, acrylic on hardboard, 51 by 61 cm, 1992

red-leaning-1992-aonm-8x10-web

“Red Leaning”, acrylic on hardboard, 12 by 15 cm, 1992

waiting-on-island-view-beach-1992-aonc-24x30-web

“Waiting on Island View Beach”, acrylic on canvas, 61 by 76 cm, 1992

turning-sky-1992-aonc-24x24-web

“Turning Sky”, acrylic on canvas, 61 by 61 cm, 1992

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Credit to a Curator

It might be said that a curator (of an art exhibition) is doing their job when they aren’t even noticed or thought about by the visitor to an exhibit. Most of the time, I never give any thought to who the curator was or how well they did their job. The exhibit either works and I enjoy it (the art work presented) or it doesn’t really make an impression on me so I just move on.

Last week though, while visiting the Vancouver Art Gallery, I found myself thinking “This shouldn’t be working but it does – Who curated this?”

The exhibit I refer to is “Emily Carr and Landon Mackenzie: Wood Chopper and the Monkey“, described in the exhibition guide:

Engaging in a dialogue with the work of eminent British Columbia artist Emily Carr, Vancouver-based painter Landon Mackenzie presents three thematically arranged galleries with more than 50 artworks that collectively span over 100 years of landscape paintings by these two artists.

Why I was skeptical about this exhibition working is because I hold Emily Carr in such high esteem. I couldn’t imagine presenting her work with anyone but, say Tom Thomson or the Group of Seven members. Landon Mackenzie is a contemporary artist, born in 1954, whose work while including some landscape elements also extends to large abstract paintings that at first glance would seem to have no way of being connected to Carr’s work. Somehow though, the juxtaposition of the work of these two artists works and delivers and pleasing and meaningful experience.

images of paintings by Mackenzie and Carr (from the Exhibition catalog)

images of paintings by Mackenzie and Carr (from the Exhibition catalog)

This exhibit runs at the Vancouver Art Gallery from 2014 September 20 to 2015 April 6. Incidentally this exhibit is the fourth in a series of exhibitions pairing Carr’s work with that of contemporary artists from the region. It was the first one that I’ve seen (or was even aware of) but my interest is piqued.

Oh, yes, the curator? Grant Arnold, Audain Curator of British Columbia Art – BRAVO!

 


Abstract Harris and Carr

Today I got back to the Art Gallery of Alberta. My first motivation was to re-visit the Emily Carr exhibit. My second reason was a visit to the new exhibition of abstract paintings by Lawren Harris, renowned landscape painter with the Canadian Group of Seven.

Lawren Harris was a founding member of the Canadian landscape school but even in some of his later landscape paintings the move to abstraction was very apparent. This exhibit, simply and appropriately called Lawren Harris Abstractions, focuses solely on the abstract works later in Harris’ career. The core of this relatively small exhibit are six paintings from the Art Gallery of Alberta’s own collection. Supplementing those works are sixteen from the National Gallery of Canada.  Probably half of the works are large (a meter or two) paintings and very interestingly there are a number of  abstract sketches, some apparently preparatory sketches for the works on canvas. There is a certain spirituality to Harris abstracts relating to Harris’s following of Theosophy.

I really enjoyed these Harris works and spent some time studying the curves, colors, shapes, volumes and composition. They are interesting from across the room and intriguing up close. The Harris exhibit runs through to September 11, 2011.

For more about Harris and his abstracts check out this CBC story from 1961.

The other exhibit I had an opportunity to visit today was Nature and Spirit: Emily Carr’s Coastal Landscapes. I had seen this exhibit a few weeks ago  and at the time vowed to visit again. It was just as impressive this time as it was the first time. I focused just on Carr’s paintings today foregoing the companion exhibit of Canadian west coast native art and artifacts. For more on my first visit see my earlier blog post.

The Carr exhibit runs until 2011 June 5 and I will get back, at least one more time.


Emily Carr at the AGA

Last week I had the pleasure of visiting “Nature and Spirit: Emily Carr’s Coastal Landscapes” at the Art Gallery of Alberta in Edmonton. Anyone that knows me well, will know that I count Emily Carr among my most favorite and influential painters.

I never miss an opportunity to see Carr’s work in person. A few years ago I took in a great show in Ottawa at the National Gallery. Any time I get to Vancouver I make a point of visiting the Vancouver Art Gallery with probably the greatest permanent collection of this west coast Canadian painter. Fortunately this AGA exhibition was organized by the Vancouver Art Gallery and features many of their key, and my favorite works. Among the great works that caused by slow trip past the works to come to a complete stand still were Scorned as Timber, Beloved of the Sky and some luscious views of the interior of the west coast rainforests (specific titles escape me at the moment).

Like the national exhibition a few years ago this exhibit of paintings is complemented by Haida Art: Mapping an Ancient Language, an equally large display of west coast native art and artifacts. The indigenous west coast peoples and cultures were a huge influence and inspiration for Carr so this pairing is ideal.

This exhibition (of 35 Carr paintings) began 2011 March 5 and runs through to June 5. If you are in the Edmonton area this is a must see exhibition. I’ll be back, a few more times – guaranteed!

 

Bending to the Sky by Randall Talbot (influenced by Emily Carr)


A Salt Spring Painting Excursion (Day 5) – Plein Air by the Creek

Wednesday Nov 14, 2007,  my third full day on Salt Spring Island. It is a cool, overcast day but painting in on my agenda. I load up my gear and head out to the Cusheon Creek area that I had scouted out the day before.

Set up for plein air painting near Cusheon Creek

I painted a couple of small studies focusing on the creek, the orange leaf litter and the green trees but I was not happy with either one. Admittedly I had not been doing much plein air painting recently and I was feeling very rusty. Still I hoped that I had captured something of the feeling of the area that I could use, along with my reference photos, to create  a decent painting back in the studio. By the time I had done the 2 sketches, the 5 degree temperature had made me feel quite chilled, so I was happy to head back to the villa for lunch (and to warm up by the fireplace).

After lunch, I headed back to the creek area but I didn’t take my painting gear, electing instead to hike with my camera and collect more reference photos. I want to explore a different portion of the valley this time so I walked up to the end of Creekside Road and then descended  into the valley and hiked back along the creek – trying to follow it all the way to where the creek empties into the ocean. Unfortunately the trail seemed to fade away and I never did get all to way to the coast. Nonetheless I had a great walk and captured another 100 photos of the area.

Stripey Tree

Cusheon Creek

Deadfall across the creek

That was pretty much the day. After dinner I started reading Emily Carr’s book  Hundreds and Thousands. Emily Carr of course is from Victoria and painted coastal landscapes that inspire me and are reminiscent of some of the landscapes that  I’ve been experiencing on the island.

As the rain came down during the evening I decided to fore-go a planned hot tub soak but I did do a bit of painting. Set-up on the kitchen table I reworked the “Trees” painting that I had done earlier in the day, down by the creek.

Trees of Cusheon Creek - oil on hardboard (8" x10")

(Incidentally, I used only palette knives for all my painting on this trip)


Skies – Two West Coast Painting

Here a couple more of my paintings from the early-nineties on the west coast (of Canada) theme.   No doubt the skies  in these paintings were influenced by skies in some works of Emily Carr

Bending to the Sky

“Bending to the Sky” 61 by 61 cm (24″x2″) acrylic on hardboard (Masonite)

Although I don’t recall where the scenes for these paintings were, I suspect they were very close together, perhaps even developed from the same reference photo.

Turning Sky

“Turning Sky” 61 by 61 cm (24″x2″) acrylic on canvas

During this period of time I was painting exclusively with acrylics, either on hardboard panels or on canvas. At this time I would build my own stretcher frames and stretched and gessoe the canvas myself.

 


Candles in the Rain

This may be my personal favorite of my own paintings . Candles in the Rain is the painting which I have considered to be my signature piece (it serves as the homepage icon on my website) and I can not imagine ever selling it. This may not be my “best” painting but it does serve as an important milestone in my painting journey.

"Candles in the Rain", a painting by Randall Talbot

This 20 by 24 inch (51x61cm) acrylic on hardboard painting was completed in 1992. It was one of a number of paintings during this period inspired by Canada’s west coast and particularly the Gulf Islands and southeastern Vancouver Island.  In the late 80’s and early 90’s I had a number of vacations in this region, traveling by bicycle and car. I was also quite inspired at the time by the works and style of Emily Carr. To see more of my coastal paintings from this time please visit this page of my website: www.randalltalbot.com